SAINT JOHN - With each passing season, the pain doesn't ease.

Her family remembers Caroline Higgins in the little things, such as planting a spring garden or fixing a birdhouse.

So with the onset of motorcycle season - and the coming first anniversary of their sister's death - Don Higgins and his siblings cringe at the thought of another senseless death that might be prevented if New Brunswick's motorcycle safety were laws more strict.

"There will be a new crop of drivers out this spring, and they'll all be at a serious risk," Higgins said.
Read On: http://telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com/city/article/1405695

The city of Saint John may become the second municipality in New Brunswick to introduce a bylaw aimed at restricting motorcycle noise.

Bathurst recently passed such a bylaw and is waiting to have it approved at the provincial level, because it requires changes to the motor vehicle act.

Fredericton has had a vehicle noise reduction strategy in place for several years now — police officers have handed out warnings and fines to owners of noisy bikes.

Read On: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2011/05/11/nb-motorcycle-noise-bylaw.html

New motorcycle riders should have graduated licences, New Brunswick's chief coroner says.

Gregory Forestell wrapped up an investigation into the death of Caroline Higgins, 46, a Saint John lawyer who died last summer after she was struck by a motorcycle while she was out for a jog.

The rider was not charged because the Crown prosecutor said there was no evidence of criminal activity; just minor mechanical problems combined with inexperience operating a motorcycle.

Forestell is also calling on the government to start a safety inspection program for motorcycles. Read On: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2011/05/10/nb-motorcycles-graduated-licenses.html

The New Brunswick government will consult residents this year regarding its motor vehicle inspection program.

One of the things that will be looked at is whether motorcycles should be subjected to an annual examination.

Michael Comeau, assistant deputy minister for safety services with the Department of Public Safety, said details such as who, what, when and where have yet to be worked out.

New Brunswick requires annual inspections for most vehicles, twice a year for others but none for motorcycles, motorized bicycles or tricycles.

Read On: http://dailygleaner.canadaeast.com/cityregion/article/1399754

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